Edmonds to Seattle, in the fog & through the locks

Edmonds to Seattle, in the fog & through the locks

October 10, 2012 | boating, photography | No Comments

American Tug Crackerjack in Fisherman's Terminal, Seattle
Departed Edmonds 1235 in thick fog, hoping it would lift. Ran radar and kept speed to just over 7 knots, marked out GPS position every 10 minutes just in case our electronics failed. A few boats passed and visibility was less than 1/8th mile, blew our fog whistle a few times and listened to a big boomy fog horn way off from a passing ferry far away. Fog lifted close to shore as we made our approach to Seattle, passing the huge Shilshole Bay Marina and making our way to the Hiram M. Chittendon Locks. This is a first time through locks for Dennis and I haven’t been through locks since I was a kid aboard our family sailboat on St. Lawrence waterways in Quebec.

We were waved into the “smaller lock” which is much easier to handle as the ropes simply pass around a big button on a wall and the whole wall rises with us so no need to keep taking in the slack on a 50 foot line as we would have to do in the “large locks” next door. We had zero wait as no other boats were in sight. We tied up and about 10 minutes later we were through to Lake Union. Fresh water! HA! Fresh water will kill off all kinds of little wildlife that may be breeding in our through-hole fittings, pipes and hoses! We plan to stay 2 nights to give those little rascals a good boot and then head back out to the salt water. Tied up with big boats at Fisheman’s Terminal and we have no real idea just where we are but we’re somewhere in Seattle and will figure it out from here!

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor, Hipstamatic
Fisherman’s Terminal is a fantastic harbor, has just had a substantial docks improvement of many millions. Staying here is very economical and interesting especially for photographers and those who appreciate the heavy equipment and fishing community.

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor, Hipstamatic
Up and out at 7:20 until 8:30 this morning, drifting around 2 of the giant boat slips with my real camera and also my iPhone Hipstamatic app camera. Wow, the soft fog and the flat glassy waters were perfect for photography! I love working with the reflections in the water, keep my camera on multiple frame mode to capture more than one image when holding finger down.

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor, Hipstamatic

 

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor

 

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor

 

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor

 

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor

 

Seattle Fisherman's terminal, foggy morning photography, boat harbor
The trick is to check your camera settings right away to make sure you are getting just what you are after and play with exposure, white balance until you get just what you want. Read your manual and play around and learn your camera BEFORE your big photographic trip and you just might be able to recall the kind of settings you need for certain situations. Play, play, play and your photos will improve. I never crop anymore unless I need just some specific slice or corner, I do all my composing right in the viewer and by golly, I am getting some real gorgeous shots. These are a few of my favorites from this morning’s shoot.

My new rule in photography is unless you are just recording an event, if you don’t see the most beautiful image of lights, darks and composition through the viewer that you have ever seen, it’s not worth pressing the shutter. I honestly am aiming for the most beautiful picture with every picture I shoot and the results are worth it. Of course lots get rejected too but way less than a few years ago. With practice and familiarity with my cameras and apps, my success rate has vastly increased. In fact the subject is not always important at all. I feel like I am seeing inside the form rather than just looking at the surface. I have this same experience when I am really involved in my life drawings or paintings, that I am actually seeing inside the form and not just looking at the surface or outline of a form. I sometimes get the sensation of flying, of weightlessness


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  1. Reply

    Chris Bronsk

    October 10, 2012

    Great shots and write up on your approach to photography. Much good advice and insight.

  2. Reply

    PaulaOB

    October 10, 2012

    Thank you Chris. It takes a long time a many photos before it really starts to simmer and boil and take off. I feel the same way about my painting, taken a long time to simmer and it’s just starting to really jell and take form. Cheers!


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